Points of Interest

Here you can find specific points of interest on Staten Island. Including commercial centers, cultural attractions, or other places that might just would not typically find. This could also incorporate unusual places, some that are a bit off the beaden path.

Found 125 blog entries about Points of Interest.

Just because you are not going away for Memorial Weekend, does not mean you cannot have fun. There are plenty of things to do on Staten Island to keep you occupied and entertained.

Beachgoers can sunbathe while taking in the view of the Verazzano Bridge by visiting Franklin D. Roosevelt Broadwalk & Beach on Father Capodanno Blvd. The boardwalk offers a senic bike trail or jog. The boardwalk also offers kayaking, tennis, or fishing off of the Ocean Breeze Fishing Pier. There is also a park on the beach that contains chess tables, benches, and bocce courts. 

There will be an annual Memorial Day foot race on the Island's East Shore waterfront.The race starts at 8:30am and their will be more than 1,000 participants for this 4-mile race. They will

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On Staten Island’s North Shore, you can find the neighborhood of Sunset Hill.  This is a nice area that doesn’t have too much of the hustle and bustle of the city life.  In this neighborhood, aside from the nice parks you can find, there are a few New York City Landmarks.  One of these landmarks is the Dorothy Valentine Smith House.

The Dorothy Valentine Smith House is located at 1213 Clove Road, on a nice plot of land that actually holds two landmarks—the other one being the John King Vanderbilt House.  The Dorothy Valentine Smith House wasn’t built until sometime between 1893 and 1895 by John Frederick Smith, the father of Dorothy Valentine Smith.

Prior to the home’s existence, this area had been used as farmland during the eighteenth century, much

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February 2014 Real Estate Market Statistics

This is the year to sell your home.  Selling your home in the spring is the best time because this is when there is the largest number of buyers.  Right now, sellers have very little competition! Serious buyers are looking for a home right now, and want to settle into the existing rate before it goes up.

There were only 10 more homes available compared to the previous month of January.  More homes were available on the market during February compared to January 2014, but fewer homes were sold.  February’s current inventory stood at 1877 with only 195 homes sold. 

In terms of speed, it took 123 days to sell 195 homes, and would take 9.62 months to clear out the 1877 homes that were available.  Last year

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In the neighborhood of Richmondtown, you can find a nice, quiet area that pulls you back in time.  This would be Historic Richmond Town, an area that has preserved Staten Island’s past for its present and future residents.  RandomToday, Historic Richmond Town is operated by both the Staten Island Historical Society and the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation.  It has many historically-significant homes, stores, shops, ad objects from the past.  Of these historically-significant buildings, some of them had been originally built here, while others had been moved here to preserve them.  A good amount of these homes are New York City Landmarks, as well. 

Before 1898, which is when the City of New York came about, Cocclestown—or what is today known as

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Edgewater Hall Staten IslandBefore the City of New York was formed in 1898, Staten Island had been comprised of five townships: Northfield, Southfield, Westfield, Castleton, and Middletown.  By 1866, however, some areas of Staten Island became their own incorporated villages, one of which was Edgewater.  These new incorporated villages were no longer a part of the townships and had created their own local governments.  The village of Edgewater was comprised of today’s Tompkinsville, Stapleton, and Clifton neighborhoods.

With Edgewater being an incorporated village, it needed a village hall.  In 1867, a small plot of land was purchased to be used as a public space.  This is where the Edgewater Village Hall had been constructed.  By 1889, the Edgewater Village Hall finally opened. 

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If you’d like to see the oldest building still standing on Staten Island, you won’t find it in Historic Richmondtown. It’s actually further north, in the Mid-Island section of Staten Island. Just below Todt Hill, in the Dongan Hills community, you will find the Billiou-Stillwell-Perine House, standing at 1476 Richmond Road. This building, which had served as a home for many generations, is one of the oldest buildings in New York, having been built in the early 1660s.

The first section of the home was erected by Pierre Billiou, whose name has been made known on Staten Island not only because of this house, but also because he was among the first permanent settlers on Staten Island. Pierre Billiou left his Amsterdam hometown with his wife in May of 1661

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The Asbury Methodist Church is one of the many landmarks located on Staten Island. It was named after Francis Asbury, an Englishman who came to America in 1771. Francis Asbury was born in 1745 and had begun his profession as a Methodist preacher by the age of twenty-one. He had volunteered to come to America when John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, had asked his ministers for volunteers to travel to the Thirteen Colonies in 1771. Francis Asbury was a circuit rider, which means that he did not have one specific church at which he preached. Instead, he had travelled around the thirteen colonies, preaching to all those who wanted to listen.

During the American Revolutionary War, most of the Methodist preachers had left America. Francis Asbury, on the

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Before the mid-nineteenth century the neighborhood of Huguenot was originally known as Bloomingview.  Huguenot got hp9_400its name from the many Huguenots, members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France that had moved to the area.  The Huguenots were being prosecuted in France for not converting to Catholicism during the mid-to-late seventeenth century, so many of them fled to America.

By 1851, the Huguenots had established and built their first church in Bloomingview, called "The Brown Church" or "The Church of the Huguenots".  The church had caught on fire in 1918 and was rebuilt on the site that it sits on now, in 1924.  Today, this church is a New York City Landmark and is known as The Reformed Church of Huguenot Park.

By the mid-to-late 1800s,

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The neighborhood of Huguenot began to be established in the middle of the seventeenth century.  At this time, the area was known as Bloomingview. Pierre Billiou and his wife Francoise were some of the first Huguenots to settle on Staten Island. Huguenots were people that were a part of the Protestant Reformed Church of France.  At that time, their people were being prosecuted for not converting to Catholicism and those who were lucky enough fled their homeland for America.Kingdom Park, Staten Island

By 1849, there were many Huguenots living in Bloomingview and, thanks to religious freedom, the Church of the Huguenots was established. Just two years later, the church was built and was known as "The Brown Church" or "The Church of the Huguenots".  By 1918, the church had caught on

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The Staten Island neighborhood of Westerleigh became a popular place a couple of decades after the formation of the Prohibition Party in 1869.  Around the late 1880s, twenty-five acres of the current Westerleigh neighborhood became Ingram Woods, Staten Islandhome to the National Prohibition Campground Association, also known as Prohibition Park.  Prohibition Park started off as a campground with some recreational facilities for its visitors.  Soon, people began to settle there instead of having to visit.

In the early twentieth century, the neighborhood of Westerleigh started to become more a residential area.  As a result, the National Prohibition Campground Association started building homes and transferred some of their land to the City of New York.  By the mid-1900s,

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